How the three part follow-up helps you get better and better at working together

Bruce Tulgan
July 08, 2020

Bruce Tulgan

Founder of RainmakerThinking, Inc. and Top Expert on Leadership Development and Generational Issues in the Workplace

One of the fundamental tenets of go-to-ism is to keep getting better and better at working with others. After all, in today's high-collaboration workplace, your results are only as strong as the team behind them, right? It's no longer enough to simply be the technical expert or the best at what you do--your success depends on others, just as their success depends on you.

But you have enough going on at work, right? It's unrealistic to expect that for every single project--big or small--you will be able to convene and debrief (even digitally) on what went right, wrong, and average.

The trick is to bake that process into the kind of regular, ongoing conversations you are already having at work, formal or informal. It may feel awkward at first, but the results will speak for themselves, and you and those you work with will gain a sterling reputation for continuous improvement in the organization.

A good follow-up is going to be your secret weapon. They are too often ignored or underutilized, and in my opinion, the follow-up makes all the difference in terms of improvement for both teams and individuals. If you're not making use of follow-ups in your communications with colleagues and/or direct reports--start now. And if you really want to take your follow-up to the next level, utilize what I call the "three part follow-up."

The three parts are simple but powerful:

  1. Celebrate success and thank people for their contributions
  2. Examine and fine-tune your modus operandi for working together
  3. Plan for next time, as best you can

The three part follow-up is a way for you to apply the process of regular continuous improvement directly to the working part of working relationships.

 

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The post How the three part follow-up helps you get better and better at working together appeared first on RainmakerThinking.

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