Daymond John - Sharks, Kardashians and the Next Generation

Daymond John is an out-of-the-box, and there-really-is-no-box kind of entrepreneur.  For anyone who wants to follow in his shoes, he would say that the first important part of accomplishing anything, is that you have to believe it can be done. Once you believe it can be done, and you CAN do it, then you systematically find your way by taking affordable steps, discovering ways to achieve incremental growth, and then surrounding yourself with people who believe in you, are smarter than you, and can mentor you in the process.

The founder of FUBU apparel started his business in his mother’s home as a young man and grew it into a multi-billion-dollar enterprise. He accepted the words of wisdom that his mother offered him; which included, “You have to figure things out for yourself,” and “You’re extremely special.” 

Daymond took a job at Red Lobster in the early years of his cottage industry and learned some important things that he could apply to his own bottom line. He was a keen observer of the company and studied their reports to find out how they did business and what made them successful. 

As an entrepreneur and speaker, Daymond John advises others to create great content, but once that is done, learn how to deliver it, brand it and market it and shine a light on the benefits your product brings. Brand it in ways that create trust. 

If Daymond gave us some life advice, he would probably tell us to treat others as we want to be treated and mingle with the people around you and figure out what you can do for them. He would also say it’s important to schedule time for your family, for your health and your faith, just as much as you schedule time for your work. Block some time off on your calendar so you can play.  Daymond also likes to maximize his time, so he often answers his emails while he’s walking on the treadmill.

As a celebrity member of the Shark Tank television show, Daymond John has learned to sharpen his axe and stay smart. His latest book, called Rise and Grind, shares the kinds of things he does every day to make it big in business. He reminds us that we all have the same twenty-four hours to fill and what we do with those hours makes all the difference. 

Daymond John also speaks about health issues and early detection, since he was once diagnosed with thyroid cancer and was successfully treated for it because of early detection. You have to be healthy to accomplish great things. He also believes that to be happy, you have to be proactive about doing the things that make a difference. You have to use your time well because once it’s gone, you can’t get it back. 

Daymond would likely tell you that if he can make it, you can make it. The only thing to remember is that it takes drive, a willingness to learn and a belief that you can really do it, to make it all happen. Go on then and sharpen your axe!

Listen to the podcast.

To book Daymond for your next event, visit his profile: https://premierespeakers.com/daymond_john

Daymond's most recent book title is: Rise and Grind. To order copies in bulk for your event, please visit Bulk Books, Amazon or 800ceoread.com

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