Scott Rasmussen

Scott Rasmussen

  • CO-FOUNDER OF ESPN & RASMUSSEN REPORTS
  • EDITOR AT LARGE, BALLOTPEDIA
  • BEST-SELLING AUTHOR
How Political and Cultural Trends Will Impact Your Business and Public Policy

Scott has spent a lifetime crunching the numbers and analyzing the trends that affect our world. He has the unique ability to identify the data and themes that really matter and then put it into...

Scott has spent a lifetime crunching the numbers and analyzing the trends that affect our world. He has the unique ability to identify the data and themes that really matter and then put it into terms that are both understandable and memorable.

Recognized as one of the world’s leading election analysts, Scott also explores the underlying issues and events that will shape the nation. He can address the questions that concern you and your audience… and do so in an entertaining manner. But at the same time, he does not hesitate to tell you what you need to hear rather than what you want to hear.

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America’s Great Turnaround

In the ‘70s, without knowing it, we were experiencing the end of the Industrial Revolution and the beginning of the most significant cultural change in American history. I call it the Great...

In the ‘70s, without knowing it, we were experiencing the end of the Industrial Revolution and the beginning of the most significant cultural change in American history. I call it the Great Turnaround:

· For two centuries leading up to the 1970s, the trend was for everything in America to get bigger, more centralized, and more homogenized.
· After the ‘70s, however, cultural trends moved in the opposite direction with everything becoming more niche-oriented, decentralized and personalized.

This Great Turnaround moved us from the industrial world kick-started by Samuel Slater to the digital world birthed by Steve Jobs and Bill Gates. In a world where culture leads and politicians lag behind, it is virtually impossible to overstate the significance of that change. Political leaders were happy to follow society at large when it led to a growing government with more power and money. They are not nearly as enthusiastic about the ongoing decentralization that is constantly shifting power from the dysfunctional political system to vibrant centers of society.

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Why I’m Optimistic About America’s Future (Despite the Failure of Our Political System)

Like most Americans, Scott believes our nation’s political system is badly broken.



Unlike most Americans, however, he has spent more than two decades up close experiencing and observing the...

Like most Americans, Scott believes our nation’s political system is badly broken.

Unlike most Americans, however, he has spent more than two decades up close experiencing and observing the reality of national politics. What he has seen convinces him that the corruption and self-serving behavior is even worse than the critics imagine. The system we have today is rigged at every level to benefit political insiders and their friends.

Despite this, or perhaps because of it, he is optimistic about America’s future.

Looking back over the years, the journey from pessimism about politics to optimism about the nation began when he finally lost faith in our political system. That freed him to see the world in a different way and to look elsewhere for solutions.

Scott's optimism comes from the power of community problem solving, fueled by the digital revolution and inspired by the Millennial Generation. We may not be able to make government work better, but that won’t stop Americans from making society better.

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It Can’t Be Done: Stories from the founding of ESPN & Rasmussen Reports

The idea for ESPN was conceived in a traffic jam on a way to a birthday party. It was launched with $9,000 in credit card advances. Within a year, the NCAA gave the new network rights to broadcast...

The idea for ESPN was conceived in a traffic jam on a way to a birthday party. It was launched with $9,000 in credit card advances. Within a year, the NCAA gave the new network rights to broadcast thousands of events, Anheuser-Busch signed the largest advertising contract in cable history, and Getty Oil committed over $100 million to the project. ESPN went on the air less than 13 months after the fateful traffic jam and quickly changed the world of television.

Rasmussen Reports became the nation’s most quoted and searched for source of public opinion information and Scott Rasmussen became the nation’s most famous pollster. But it began as one man working out of an office above his garage. Like ESPN, this company thrived by using new technology to deliver quality content to a passionate audience. Scott became a regular fixture on television with appearances on the BBC, Fox, CNN, CNBC, and countless local stations.

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